Wednesday, April 8, 2015

G is for Get Back Up

I missed F, which makes me sad because I was looking forward to that one. I was going to talk about fan fiction. I know if I try to make up the missed letter it will put me in a perpetual game of catch up and I have no desire to go there. So today I'm getting up, back on the horse and moving on.

G is also for grammar. Wait, stop, don't leave! I'm actually not one of the grammar police. I try very hard to make well informed grammar decisions in my writing and everyday life. However, that is not where I was going with this post. I  have realized that I spend a large amount of time worrying about grammar, so much so that it often inhibits my writing progress. To myself and others who are still working out the kinks in this writing thing I am recommending grammar light. If your not sure exactly how something is supposed to be written, in your first draft, do the best you can and move on. You will have other passes when you move on to the editing phase.

If you are looking for grammar tips delivered in a smart and funny way Grammar Girl is an awesome resource. What do you think about grammar? Do you feel that stopping to answer grammar questions while writing is distracting or will it drive you batty until you know how it's supposed to be done?

Good luck to all those taking the April challenges and thanks for stopping by. Please leave me a comment and let me know where your're visiting from so I can follow you back.

10 comments:

  1. As someone in the education game, I know how much of a difference correct grammar can make when evaluating a child's piece of writing but I also think that when the writing muse takes the reigns then the creativity should not be inhibited by mere rules. I often say to children to write a draft first letting the writing flow and then and only then go back and re-write remembering to use a dictionary for spelling, grammar notes and literacy objectives as are needed.
    Lovely to meet via the A to Z Challenge and well done for getting back in the saddle :) Special Teaching at Pempi’s Palace

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    1. This is exactly how I work and how I have taught my kiddos to write.

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  2. I dont stop writing to check grammar, but when I'm in the editing stage I look things up. The thing I've learned from my editor is that some grammar rules are bendy, especially when bent a little to produce style.

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    1. I love that you said they are bendy, but not breakable. I have read some books where the grammar was so bad that I had to stop reading. Often it caused me to throw the book across the room, something I have had to refrain from doing since I started using my phone as an ereader.

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  3. someone once said that for every grammar rule in English language there is about 2 exceptions :) I'm going with that. :D

    /passing by on my a-z visiting tour ;) /

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    1. That's awesome! I vote we all go with that.

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  4. I was lucky, I went to a Grammar school here in the UK (a very long time ago) and Grammar comes easily to me. We got a good grounding. There are always questions though, aren't there, when you suddenly think - is that right? i have lots of Grammar guides (including the American 'Strunk and White' one, fabulous) but the one I use most is the one I bought for my children. Nice and clear! ~Liz (my blog is at http://www.lizbrownleepoet.com not at the address Google will take you to when you click on my name, although links are there!

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    1. I love the idea of using a children's grammar guide. It is sometimes clearer and less pretentious.

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  5. I like the 'grammar light' phrase you used. I usually first let my thoughts flow and then check the grammar.
    Co-Host AJ's wHooligan for the A to Z Challenge 2015

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    1. I think free flowing thoughts are my favorite kind. Especially when I can do it in a group.

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